How Will the 2020 Presidential Election Affect the Stock Market?

How Will the 2020 Presidential Election Affect the Stock Market?

How will the 2020 presidential election affect the stock market? That’s a big question on the minds of many. Today, we’ll dig into some numbers. We’ll show you what happened to the stock market in the three months before and after previous presidential elections.

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2020 election affect the stock market

This year is off to a crazy start. It started with the Coronavirus. That caused the stock market to drop by about 34%. From the bottom of the bear market to today, we’re now close to all-time highs. The stock market has increased by almost 50%.

The virus is still a factor in our lives. Now we get to add a presidential election to the mix. How will the campaign season influence the market?

Elections and the Stock Market: Historical Data

We are focusing on the three months before a presidential election. This means August, September and October. And we are looking at the three months after. This includes November, December, and January. We have nine election years going back to 1980.

The 3 Months Before

The average gain of the stock market for the three months before an election was about 0.75%. Stocks improved six out of the nine years.

The 3 Months After

For the three months after an election, the stocks gained 2.36%, on average. It was positive in seven of the nine years.

The Outlier: 2008

There was an outlier. 2008 was a really bad year. From August to October 2008, the stock market dropped by about 23%. Following the election, the stock market continued to decline. It fell another 22.5%.

If you remove this outlier from the data set, the results look much different. 

Leading up to the election, the gain improves to about 3.5%. After the election, if you take out this outlier, the stock market improved 5%.

Will this year be more like 2008?

The election didn’t have the type of impact on the stock market that one might think. But you might be wondering right now, “Will this year be more like 2008?”

But there are also reasons to expect this rally to continue. Some data points to better things ahead.

Vaccine Progress

Companies are making progress on a vaccine. A lot of the optimism in the stock market relates to the optimism of a vaccine coming to market sometime next year. There are a number of companies now entering second and third stage trials.

The Big Question: Do Your Long Term Plans Depend on the 2020 Election?

It is hard to make big allocation decisions based on short term events. Most of the historical data points to the election not being a significant factor to stock market performance.

Your long term plans aren’t likely to change based on the outcome of this election. This makes it very difficult to make a decision based on that outcome.  .

The election concerns many people. There’s a very big divide between the two sides. It’s very contentious and very emotional. This creates a desire do something. Some think if “Candidate A” wins, things are going to go downhill. And if “Candidate B” wins, things are going to be great. But we don’t know what that outcome will be.

Making big decisions based on short-term events, creates more chances to make mistakes. That’s not a real good way to do things.

You need to base your asset allocation decisions on your long term plans. You shouldn’t base them on what happens in a presidential election.

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Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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10 Years From Retirement: What Should I Be Doing?

10 Years Away From Retirement: What Should We Be Doing?

Heidi asks: “We’re 10 years away from retirement.  What should we be doing to prepare? Should we pay off our mortgage before we retire?”

Please note:  This is a highlight from our July Ask a CFP Pro show.

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Transcript: 10 years from retirement: What should we be doing?

We want to retire in about 10 years. What’s the best way to prepare for that? And is it best pay off our house before retiring?

Still in growth mode

If you’re 10 years away from retirement, you still should be in growth mode. This means you’re more heavily invested in stocks. You’re looking to pursue higher returns.

Over the next decade, bonds aren’t going to help you a whole lot. You’re looking at 1% to 2% returns going forward based on current yields.

If there is a major downturn in the stock market, you have some time to recover from that. Even though we’re not out of this bear market yet, there could be another one in the future. You’re still going to be able to recover. If we do have that downturn again, it becomes a great buying opportunity. You may never find prices that low again.

Volatility shouldn’t be a significant concern at this point. As you get closer, when you’re five years away, that story may change. But, right now, you still have the ability to enjoy those compounded returns. If you can save and invest for higher returns, it should pay off for you in the long term.

I wouldn’t have any problems being 100% invested in stocks for the next four or five years, if I were you. I think the benefits will outweigh the long term risk. It could be tough to do. When you have those volatile times, nobody likes to see their balances go down. But again, I think the growth will be significant for you.

Eliminate debt

Should you pay off your house before you retire? If you can do so in a reasonable fashion, absolutely—yes! In fact, you should try to have all your debts paid off by the time you retire. That means car payments, your mortgage, and credit card debts. The fewer expenses you have, the better your retirement is going to be.

Retirement is all about cash flow. In our experience, the biggest reason people run out of money is because they spend too much. And debt payments are a form of spending. So the more you spend to pay debts, the less you have to do other things. Or it could mean you have to take more money from your nest egg than you should.

Eliminating debt can be a huge boost to your retirement plans as a whole.

Here are some other things that you want to do

Know your Social Security numbers…

Get your Social Security earnings record and benefit estimates. This is going to be a key component in helping you plan for retirement. It will help you make good decisions about when to start your Social Security benefits. And for most of us, it’s still a key part of our income.

Get organized

Get things organized. Understand where all your accounts are and how they’re invested. This allows you to create a better plan.

What does retirement look like?

It’s too soon to do detailed budgeting. But at the same time, you can start thinking about what your retirement is going to look like. You can think about what you want to do in retirement. Then you can see how much it will cost.

Health insurance

Have a good idea of what your health insurance is going to be if you’re going to retire before age 65. This is huge. If you have to go out and buy your own health insurance, that’s a big expense that you’re going to incur. You want to know what that’s going to be because it will have an impact on the numbers.

Work on your current cash flow

The last thing I would suggest is get your current cash flow situation in order. Know where your money’s going. Know how you’re spending it. If you can rearrange things to focus more on saving and eliminating debt, you’ll be glad you did. You have to make those things a priority. When you do that, you’ll have some flexibility and freedom in your retirement.

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3 Ideas to Plan For Lower Returns

3 Ideas to Help Plan for Lower Returns

What we earn on our nest egg is a key component to our future plans. Over the past month, we talked about the potential impact of both lower bond and stock returns. What can you do to prepare for this? Today we’ll share 3 ideas to help you plan for lower future investment returns.

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Check out the other episodes from this month...

All month long, we’ve talked about the possibility of lower future returns for both stocks and bonds.  

What happens if future returns are less than historical averages? Bond yields indicate the future results from those investments could be well below their averages. And many “experts” believe future stock returns could also be less. This combination creates some significant challenges as you head into retirement.

Here are 3 things you can do to plan for lower future returns.

1. Delay Your Retirement

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Delaying your retirement improves your Social Security and pension benefits (if you will receive a pension). This works three different ways.  It shrinks the discounts you face for early retirement.  It increases your primary benefit. Or, with Social Security, you can receive delayed retirement credits. 

Waiting to retire also helps solve a problem with health insurance in retirement.  You are eligible to receive Medicare at age 65.  This means you won’t have to buy an expensive individual health insurance policy. 

Delaying retirement also allows you to reduce debt, save more, and benefit from compounded returns.

2. Monitor Your Spending

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In my experience, the primary reason people run out of money in retirement is overspending. The more you withdraw from your nest egg, the higher the chance you deplete your savings. Take a good look at your retirement budget. Try to find expenses or costs you can eliminate.

3 ideas to help plan for lower returns

3. Own More Stocks

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Investing involves a trade off. Trying to earn more can mean the short-term shocks are more severe. But, it may be necessary to consider an allocation that provides more opportunities for long-term growth. This may be hard to do, considering we haven’t completely recovered from a pretty steep drop. But in the long-run, the risks could be worth it, even if it is for a short period of time.

Be Flexible

It is important to be flexible.  The plans you created may need to be adjusted as the world around us changes.  None of us know what future returns will be.  But we need to consider what happens if future returns are lower.  Making good decisions now can help improve your chances for longer term success.  And, if things turn out better than expected, everything will be fine.

3 ideas to help plan for lower returns
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Is the 4 Percent Rule Dead?

Is the 4 Percent Rule Dead?

Over the past two weeks, we’ve discussed expected future returns for both stocks and bonds. Several experts feel the future results will be much lower than historical averages. So that makes us wonder, “Is the 4 percent rule dead?”

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Lower expected future returns for both stocks and bonds can affect your retirement. Many “experts” expect stocks to produce below-average returns over the next decade. They forecast somewhere in the neighborhood of 6.5% per year. They also expect lower returns from bonds—somewhere between 1 and 2 % per year.

Lower Future Returns and the 4 Percent Rule

If these lower returns happen, it can create a major challenge for retirees. If these predictions hold, a well-balanced portfolio would earn somewhere between 4% and 5% per year.

Is the 4 percent rule dead

For the past 20 years or so, we’ve been big believers in the 4% rule for generating retirement income. This rules says you can take 4% of your retirement savings as income. So if you have a $500,000 nest egg, that translates to $20,000 per year or $1,666 per month.

Why Do We Believe in The 4 Percent Rule?

We use this guideline because it reduces the risk of running out of money during your lifetime. This has been back-tested during some of the biggest bear markets, and it has a high rate of success.

When you use historical return data, you can see why. Historical data shows a 60% stock-40% bond portfolio should grow by about 7% per year. So if you only take 4%, you would expect your account to grow by 3% per year. That’s enough to help your income grow each year to maintain your purchasing power.

What if Returns are Lower?

But what happens if the experts are right? What if those returns are less than average? Does the 4% rule still work?

In theory, if you earn at least 4% per year, you can take that much income and still maintain your principal. But there are a couple of things that come to mind. First, your odds of success will decrease a little. And, your ability to grow your principal to grow your income is also limited.

The second thing: what if you need to take more than 4% from your savings?  A lower return environment going forward means you will increase the risk of running out of money during your lifetime.

Balancing Risk and Reward

Financial planners always talk about balancing risks and rewards. And the amount of income you take from your retirement savings is a perfect example. The 4% rule is simply a guideline to help you think about that risk. And even with lower returns expected in the future, it still has merit.

No matter what future returns are, one thing remains true. The higher your withdrawal rate, the more you risk running out of money. If you are unsure of how this impacts you, talk to a financial planner.

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Things continue to improve…

Things continue to improve

The pandemic shut down our economy earlier this year. Now America is slowly reopening. Here are some charts and data showing that things continue to improve.

From Liz Ann Sonders of Charles Scwaab…

From economist, Scott Grannis….

Airline passengers

things are continuing to imrpove

Gasoline Sales

things are cointuing to improve &nbsp

Service Sector Activity

things continue to improve Scott Grannis writes an outstanding blog, he uses a very data driven approach.  Check it out here.

From Economist Brian Wesbury of First Trust Portfolios…

 

Retail sales and food services

 
things are starting to improve

 

 

Industrial Production and Manufacturing Output

things are starting to improve

Mr. Wesbury also believes the recession is over. Read more here.

From Thomas Lee of fundstrat.com

And although this tweet is a little older, I still thought this was very interesting.      

There are still risks...

There are still risks ahead.  The pandemic isn’t over, and the risk of a second wave of infections remains a threat.  But every now and then, it is important to look past the bad news that dominates the media.  While we aren’t back to normal, things continue to improve.

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Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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How Lower Interest Rates Affect Your Retirement

How Lower Interest Rates Affect Your Retirement

Lower interest rates create some obvious problems for retirees. Things like savings accounts and CD’s just aren’t earning much. But there is a longer-term problem with these low yields. Today, I’ll discuss how lower interest rates affect your retirement.

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How Lower Interest Rates Affect your Retirement

For many, bonds are a significant part of your retirement nest egg. And, in my mind, there are three reasons to use them.

Reason 1: Less Volatility

Bonds reduce volatility. Think about what happened in March. The stock market fell over 30%. If you were 100% invested in equities, your account went down a lot! If you had 40% in bonds, the drop was much smaller.

Reason 2: A Place to Invest Your Future Income

Bonds give you a source of funds to generate your income. Selling stocks when they are down 35% to get your monthly check isn’t ideal. Putting your future income in bonds solves this problem.

Reason 3: A Way to Rebalance

Bonds give you a source of funds to buy stocks at better prices. Let’s say we get another big drop in the stock market in the next few months. I’m not saying we will, but if we do, you have a source of funds to buy stocks at those lower prices.

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Lower Risk, Less Return

Owning bonds will reduce your future long-term returns. They just don’t generate the results stocks do. For example, the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index fund has averaged just over 9% per year over the past 15 years.  The Vanguard Total Bond Market Index fund has averaged 4.3% over the same time frame.  Adding more bonds reduces the impact of a bear market.  But it also reduces your future returns.

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Low Yields Translate to Lower Future Returns

Last week, we talked about lower expected returns for stocks and how that impacts your retirement.   The current low yield environment also means we should expect lower future returns for bonds too.

In fact, Vanguard recently said we should expect bonds to generate returns of about 1-2% per year over the next decade. 

So if we expect stock market returns of 6.5% and bond returns of 2% here’s what happens.

This is a real challenge when you need your savings to create income and grow to keep pace with inflation.

Lower interest rates and yields could have a major impact on your retirement plans.  It’s worth having a conversation with a financial planner to see how it could affect you.

What do you think?  Add your comments below!

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Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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What if Future Stock Returns Are Lower?

What If Future Stock Returns Are Lower?

How many times have you heard this, “The long term average return of the stock market is 10% per year”?  What if future returns for the stock market are less than average?  How would that impact your retirement?

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One of the things we all set out to do is use our retirement savings to create income. That income has to last as long as we do, and it needs to grow over time to keep up with inflation. Historically speaking, owning stocks has been the best way to help us do that.

Future returns using historical data

A lot of people create retirement projections using historical return data. They might use 10% for stocks and 4% or so for bonds. In that scenario, you should expect an account with 60% stocks and 40% bonds to earn 7.6% per year. A 50/50 mix should earn 7%. A more conservative 40% stock, 60% bond mix should earn 6.4%.

What if future stock returns are lower?

But what if over the next decade, stock returns were well below historical averages? Say only 6.5%? How does that impact how you plan?

Now that 60% stock, 40% bond portfolio would only have an expected 5.5% return. The 50/50 portfolio projects to earn 5.25% and the 40% stock 60% bond mix earns 5%.

That changes things quite a bit when you start looking at the income you can take and the risks of running out of money.

How likely are lower future returns?

Companies like Charles Schwab, BlackRock, and Vanguard all believe future stock returns will be below the historical averages.

Schwab believes future stock market returns over the next decade will be around 6.3%. Vanguard believes the returns will be similar at 6.5%. BlackRock projects 6.9%. 

Of course, they could all be wrong. Returns from stocks could be closer to the long-term numbers. But, you need to prepare for the possibility they are correct. And you also have to realize their guess about the future could also be too optimistic.

By and large, I’m an optimist. I expect stocks to act like stocks. But as a planner, it is important to prepared for something like this, especially if you are nearing retirement or just recently retired.

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Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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Ask A CFP: Are You Pessimistic or Optimistic?

Ask A CFP® Pro: Are You Pessimistic or Optimistic?

Today is the first episode of our Ask a CFP series.  Each month we will answer your questions about money, investing, and retirement.  The big question today: “Are you pessimistic or optimistic about where we are going?”

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Are you pessimistic or optimistic

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Today's Questions

Here are the questions we answer on today’s show:

  1.  Are airline stocks a good buy? What’s the best way to invest?
  2.  My employer stopped matching my 401(k), should I also stop my contributions?
  3. Since my IRA has decreased in value, is now a good time to convert it to a Roth IRA?
  4. With businesses starting to reopen, is now a good time to buy stocks?
  5. Do you think we’ve seen the end of the bear market? Are you pessimistic or optimistic about where we are going?

What is your pressing question?

Do you have a question about money, investing or retirement.  Here is your chance to get straight answers from a Certified Financial Planner­™ Pro.  Click on the button to send us your questions.  We’ll answer it on an upcoming episode of our Ask a CFP show.  

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You can also ask your question in the comments section below!

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Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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Are Card Rewards Worth It?

Are Credit Card Rewards Worth It?

Are credit card rewards such as cash back or travel perks worth it? Should you use multiple credit cards to get better rewards? 

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Are Credit Card Rewards WOrth it

On May 9th, the Marietta Times ran an article written by NerdWallet. “Why Family Loyalty Shouldn’t Apply to Your Credit Cards.”  It encourages people to shop for things like cash back perks and travel rewards. It also encourages people to consider using multiple cards to maximize those rewards.

Are The Rewards Worth It?

Are credit card rewards worth it? You know those frequent flyer miles or cash rebates for your purchases. For some people, the answer is yes. I’ve personally benefited from using travel rewards on my credit card purchases.

But there is a caveat. The rewards are only worth it if you pay your full balance each month.

The Basic Math…

You buy $100 worth of groceries. Your card gives you 2% cash back, so you get a $2 reward. If you pay your bill, it’s $2 in your pocket. But if you only make the minimum $10 payment, you’ll spend more in interest than your perks are worth. And that will happen in two months or fewer too

Are Card Rewards Worth It?

Should You Use Multiple Cards?

I think this adds more complexity than it’s worth. You have to keep track of more things, make more payments, and stay more organized. From my experience, simple is better, cleaner, and reduces mistakes.

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The Verdict: Good for Some, But Not Everyone

You have to be very careful with these so-called perks. They can be a perverse incentive. They can give you the rationalization to use your credit card, even if you can’t pay the balance each month. And they can cause you to spend more than if you were using cash or a debit card.

Are the perks and rewards worth it? For some, yes. But you must do it responsibly. If you can’t pay for all your purchases each month, the rewards don’t matter.

Worth it Credit Card Rewards
Card Rewards Worth It
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3 Questions To Help Evaluate Your Cash Flow

3 Questions to Help You Evaluate Your Cash Flow

The COVID-19 Pandemic forced a lot of major changes to our lives. IT has also created a unique opportunity to gauge how we spend money. Today, we’ll pose three questions to help you evaluate your cash flow.

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Questions To help Evaluate Your Cash Flow
3 Questions to Evaluate Your Cash Flow

A week ago, we talked about the importance of building your financial safety net. One of the first steps was to take a hard look at your spending. Today, we have three questions to help you evaluate your cash flow.

Question 1

Evaluate Your Cash flow

The things you really enjoyed—the activities that added value to your life, you’ll find a way to do them again. Eliminating the ones you don’t miss and the costs associated with them, can help you get your budget back on track.

Question 2

Questions to Help Evaluate Cash Flow

Was it that fancy cup of coffee, or breakfast sandwich on the way to work? Could it be something bigger? If you haven’t missed it when you were forced to stop buying it, you don’t have to start just because you can. You may find that many of those little things can add up to a lot of money each month.

Question 3

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When things get tight, we start to look at the details. It’s easy to identify the line-items on your bank statement that cause you stress. It could be the amount you spend eating out. Or, that pesky gym membership you don’t need or use. And then there are all those subscriptions. It could be something even bigger like a car payment.

Weigh the stress of those expenses now that times are tight to see the true value they provide to your life. If those two things are “out of balance,” take some time to clean them up.

Remember, there are no wrong answers to those three questions.

This pandemic forced us to alter our spending habits. In the process, it revealed what was essential, important, and truly valuable to our lives. And that can help us make better choices about money going forward. It can help us build our financial safety net and save for our future.

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evaluate your cash flow questions
Questions to Evaluate Your Cash Flow

 

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Financial Planning

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Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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