Taxing Social Security

Taxing Social Security

Today we talk about taxing Social Security. We will discuss:

  • the factors that go into determining whether your Social Security income is taxable or not
  • give you some examples, and
  • tell you about a few potential surprises that you may encounter.

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Taxing Other Types Of Retirement Income

Last week we discussed how other types of common retirement income are taxed. Click Here to watch that episode.

Today, we focus on taxing Social Security benefits. For some people, your Social Security may be taxable. Here is how we can determine if your benefits will be taxed.

Provisional Income

It starts with your provisional income. To determine if your Social Security is taxable, you’ll need to compute this. It includes:

  • half of your Social Security
  • dividends
  • interest, both taxable and non taxable
  • earnings
  • pension income
  • IRA distributions, and
  • other income

If your provisional income is less than

  • $32,000, for a couple
  • $25,000 for a single person,

your Social Security benefits are not taxed.

But if your provisional income is between

  • $32,000- $44,000 for a couple
  • $25,000- $34,000, for a single filer,

50% of your Social Security income is taxed.

And if your provisional income is over

  • $44,000 for a couple
  • $32,000 for a single person

85% of your Social Security benefits is taxed.

Examples

John and Carol

John receives about $27,600 in Social Security benefits and Carol receives $21,600. That totals $49,200. Half of their benefit is $24,600. They receive $2,000 a month from John’s IRA, for a total of $24,000. Total, they earn $5,000 per year in dividends and another $1,500 in interest.

Their provisional income is $55,100. This means 85% of their Social Security benefits are taxable.

taxing Social Security

Mary

Mary was recently widowed. She receives $21,600 in Social Security, half of which is $10,800. She takes a required minimum distribution from her IRA which was $8,300. Her provisional income in this case is $19,100. This is below the $25,000 threshold, so her Social Security benefits are not taxed.

taxing Social Security

Carl

Carl is single. He receives $2,000 per month from Social Security, $24,000 total. Half of that is $12,000. He also gets about $2,000 in dividends and $1,000 in interest. The rest of Karl’s income comes from a Roth IRA. He takes $50,000 from his Roth account. His provisional income is $15,000.  His Social Security benefits will not be taxed.

The Roth IRA distributions do not add to his provisional income.This is an additional benefit of using a Roth IRA in your retirement planning. Distributions from the Roth are not taxed. They also won’t make your Social Security benefits taxable.

taxing Social Security

Potential Surprises

Change in Marital Status

The first surprise is a sudden change in your marital status. If you find yourself suddenly single, you may owe more in taxes. The income limits for single people are lower than those for married couples. A sudden change in marital status may lead to more of your social security benefits being taxed.

Change in Income

A sudden increase in your income can also have a hidden surprise. This normally happens when you reach the age for required minimum distributions. At age 72, you have to start taking money from your IRA account. This will add to your provisional income. The distribution may cause your Social Security income to be taxed

Talk to a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional

There are a lot of factors that affect your taxes in your retirement, and you can manage some of them. Talk to a financial planner to learn more.

 


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About the Author

Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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How Retirement Income is Taxed

How Retirement Income is Taxed

How Retirement Income is Taxed

Today we look at how the most common types of retirement income are taxed.  We look at:

  • The common types of accounts retirees use
  • The types of income taxed at the highest rates
  • Types of income which receive favorable tax treatment

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When you retire, you go from earning a paycheck to using your savings to create a paycheck. You will still have to pay income taxes. Today, we look at the common types of accounts retirees use to create income, and how they are taxed.

Retirement Plans and IRA's

This might be a 401k, a 403b or even a 457 deferred compensation plan. Many people roll those over into an IRA.

The taxation of the income generated from those accounts depends on the contributions. If you made pre-tax contributions—meaning you took a tax deduction—the income is taxable. Your contributions, your employer’s contributions, and the earnings are taxed as ordinary income. Tax rates for ordinary income start at 10%. The maximum tax rate is 37%.

If you used the Roth type accounts, the contributions happened on an after tax basis. This means withdrawals from these accounts are not taxed.

Individual and Joint Accounts

The second type of account that retirees use is an individual or a joint account. If you have this type of account, you pay taxes “as you go”. The investments in those accounts often pay dividends or interest. Interest is usually taxed as ordinary income. Dividends paid by a common stock get favorable tax treatment. In most cases, the highest tax rate for qualified dividends is 15%.

You may also have capital gains. A capital gain happens when you or one of the investments you own sells an investment. If you own a mutual fund, that mutual fund may buy and sell stocks and bonds inside the mutual fund. The gains pass to you as a shareholder.

If you own an individual investment, and you sell those shares, you can generate a capital gain as well. If you owned the position for at least a year, the gain is a long-term capital gain. Long-term gains get favorable tax treatment. The highest capital gains rate is 20%. Most people will pay 15%. The full amount of the sale is not usually taxed. Taxes are due on the amount above what you originally paid for the investment.

This can be a factor if you are using a systematic withdrawal. This strategy involves selling shares of your investments to generate monthly income. Part of the income is going to be taxable, and part of it is going to be return of your principal. The taxable part may get taxed at lower rates.

Pension Plans

The other type of account used to create income in retirement is a pension plan. If your company offered a pension plan, the income is taxable as ordinary income.

Annuities

Another common type of account is an annuity. If you annuitize a contract, part of the income is taxable. The balance is a return of your principal.

Social Security

The last type of income source that’s taxable in retirement is Social Security. We will cover taxes of Social Security benefits next week.

Talk to a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional

Knowing how taxes impact retirement can help you plan for a better future. If you have questions or concerns, talk to a financial planner.

 


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About the Author

Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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Can I Max My Roth and My 401k?

Can I Max My Roth IRA and My 401k?

Sandy wants to know if she can max her Roth IRA and her 401k contributions.  Let’s dig into the rules.

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Do you want to hear the full show?

The full episode is over 25 minutes long.  And we’ve found that not everyone wants to spend that much time listening to things.  But if you want to listen to the entire episode, it is below.

We answer:

Transcript: Can I Max My Roth IRA and My 401k?

This question is from Sandy. She asks, “Can you contribute the maximum amount to a Roth IRA and the Roth account in the government’s Thrift Savings Plan?”

The answer is yes—if you qualify to make a Roth IRA contribution.

Here are the contribution limits for 2020. For retirement plans whether it’s the Thrift Savings Plan, a 403b plan at the hospital or a school, or a 401k plan, you can contribute $19,500. If you’re over 50, there’s a catch-up contribution. That amount is $6,500. You can contribute $6,000 to a Roth IRA. If you’re 50 or older, you can contribute an additional $1,000.

If you wanted to maximize both, and you’re under age 50, that’s $25,500. If you’re 50 or older, that’s $33,000 total per person. If you’re married, you can do both, and your spouse can do both. If you have that much extra income, that’s phenomenal!

There are income limits for Roth IRA contributions. You can make the maximium Roth IRA contribution if your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is below these limits. For married couples filing a joint return, the limit is $196,000. If you’re single, that limit is $124,000. If you’re married and you file separate returns, the income limit is $10,000.

If your MAGI is over those limits, your eligibility to make those Roth IRA contributions changes. You may be able to do a partial contribution or none at all.

The Married Filing Separately Tax Trap

The married filing separately thing is an interesting little trap. A lot of people will file separate returns to try to save on state income taxes. But it has a hidden impact on things like your IRA contributions. It impacts deductions for traditional IRAs, Roth IRA contributions and Roth conversions.

If you’re married filing a separate return and your income is over $10,000, a lot of those things disappear. You want to be very careful with that. You don’t want to get a surprise later on.

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About the Author

Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors.    He specializes in helping hard working, middle class families plan for retirement.

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Death of the Stretch IRA: Should You Convert to a Roth IRA?

Death of the Stretch IRA: Should You Convert Your IRA to a Roth IRA?

The SECURE Act killed the Stretch IRA. This could mean a nice tax bill for someone you care about. The big question that has come from this: “Should you convert your IRA to a Roth IRA?”

Watch: Should You Convert Your IRA to a Roth IRA?

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Death of the Stretch IRA

In December, the federal government passed the SECURE Act. And one of the biggest provisions of that bill was the elimination of the Stretch IRA. This impacts non-spouse beneficiaries of your IRA, 401k or other retirement plan accounts. That means your kids, grandkids, etc. It doesn’t affect spouses.

Under the old rules, your kids could spread out the distributions from an inherited IRA over a long period of time. Now, your kids will have to liquidate those accounts within 10 years.

Schedule a 15 Minute Call

Do you have a question? Would you like to talk about how we can help you plan for a better retirement?
Click here to schedule a brief 15 minute call.  

Converting Your IRA to a Roth IRA

One strategy you can use to address this is to convert your IRA to Roth IRAs. This means you pay taxes on the amounts you convert now, and the money then grows tax-free. And when certain conditions are met, your kids won’t pay any taxes on their distributions.

Should you convert your IRA to a Roth IRA? The answer is very complicated and will be different for everyone. Here are the key considerations

1. Who Pays Higher Taxes?

Who has the higher tax rate? Converting your IRA to a Roth IRA means you pay the taxes. You have to understand who has the higher tax rate. If your tax bracket is the same as your kids, the conversion may not be worth it. But, if your kids pay taxes at a higher rate, the math changes.

State taxes also matter in this.  If your kids live in Florida where there is no state income tax, that needs to be considered.  Likewise if they live in a high-tax state—like New York—it changes the math.

2. Watch the Hidden Taxes

Pay attention to the hidden taxes? Converting your IRA could impact the taxes on your Social Security benefits. It could also trigger taxes on your Medicare premiums due to the income related adjustments. You’ll want to look at those elements too.

3. Can't Convert Your Required Minimum Distributions

If you are older than 72, you have to be careful. The rules won’t allow you to convert your required minimum distributions. You have to satisfy those before you convert.  This may make it more expensive than you think.

4. Know the Total Costs

Look at the total cost of your strategy. There are some complex strategies you can use to preserve some of the “stretch provisions.” They use some advanced trust planning. You have to weigh the cost of the trust, plus the tax costs of setting them up.

Should you convert your IRA to a Roth IRA? It’s a good question to ask and consider in your plans. But there are a lot of complexities. You should talk to a tax expert and a financial planner to help you look at all aspects.

Schedule a 15 Minute Call

Do you have a question? Would you like to talk about how we can help you plan for a better retirement?
Click here to schedule a brief 15 minute call.  

What's On Your Mind?

Do you have a question about what’s happening in the world of finance or investing?  Is there a topic that has you curious?  We’d love to hear from  you.

 We’ll do our best to answer it in a future episode.  To submit your question, fill out the form.  If you prefer, you can send us an email directly.  That email address is neal@flemingwatson.com

Enter Your Question Here

Financial Planning

About the Author

Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors  He typically works with people who are planning for retirement.  Fleming Watson is a Registered Investment Advisory firm located in Marietta Ohio.  Our firm primarily serves Marietta, Parkersburg, Williamstown, St. Marys, Belpre, Vienna and the surrounding communities in Washington and Noble Counties in Ohio and Wood and Pleasants county in West Virginia.

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The Financial Planners 2019 Holiday Gift Guide

What do you get the young adult child who already has everything?  How many gift cards do you really want to buy? Socks?  Really?  Fear not! We have created the Financial Planner’s 2019 Holiday Gift Guide.  And it is sure to be a big hit.   

Watch: 2019 Holiday Gift Guide

Please be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel and like our  Facebook page.  

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Free Download: The Financial Planner's 2019 Holiday Gift Guide

For that last minute shopper, here is our Financial Planner’s 2019 Holiday Gift Guide.  We cover the basics of Roth IRA’s and 529 Plans.  We’ll also show you—and the lucky recipient—what kind of impact your gift can make on their life.  Click on the button to download your free copy.

The Struggle is Real!

As December rolls around each year, it is always a struggle to come up with gift ideas. And I thought maybe you were having similar problems. So I decided to come up with the financial planners holiday gift guide.

Do you have younger adult children or grandchildren? Tired of buying gift cards to restaurants they hate or ugly socks?

The Perfect Solution: A Roth IRA

What could be a better gift than years of tax free compounded growth? That’s right folks, a Roth IRA makes a perfect gift for that young adult in your life.

Just imagine the riveting conversation you’ll have sitting around the tree. You can talk about compound interest and how “You may not appreciate this now, but one day you’ll be glad you have it. Shoot I wish my parents had started a Roth IRA for me for Christmas. Instead, I got a garage door opener.”   

True Story…

One year, as a twenty-something, my parents bought me a garage door opener.  Not only was it a surprise, it was one of the best gifts I’ve ever received.  You don’t appreciate it until you have to get out of your car in a driving rain storm to open the garage door!

Cam Hardiman

This is Jim’s great grandson (and Neal and Susan’s grandson).  Cam Hardiman was born on November 3rd, 2019.

For the Young Child: Tax Free Growth, for College

We’ve all watched these kids tear into boxes like a tornado. Only to see them spend more time playing with the boxes.

Not this year.  No boxes.  No hermetically sealed plastic packaging you can only open with a blow torch. 

What could be better? You guessed it, a 529 Plan.  This means tax free growth—FOR COLLEGE! 

 

Seriously Good Gifts

Roth IRA’s and 529 plans make terrific Christmas gifts. They aren’t exciting, and you may actually be able to hear  eyes roll.

But, at some point, they will be far more useful than that pair of socks, the remote control car or even a garage door opener.

A Roth IRA offers your kids or grandkids tax free compounding for their retirement. It may not be much today. In thirty or forty years they’ll look back and say, “Wow! Mom and Dad (or grandma and grandpa) did this for me. And look at it now.”

Same thing with 529 plans. The costs of college won’t be coming down anytime soon. At some point. someone will appreciate it more than you may ever know.

Here. We'll show you what we mean.

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2019 Holiday Gift Guide
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What's On Your Mind?

Do you have a question about what’s happening in the world of finance or investing?  Is there a topic that has you curious?  We’d love to hear from  you.

 We’ll do our best to answer it in a future episode.  To submit your question, fill out the form.  If you prefer, you can send us an email directly.  That email address is neal@flemingwatson.com

Enter Your Question Here

Financial Planning

About the Author

Neal Watson is a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional and a Financial Advisor with Fleming Watson Financial Advisors  He typically works with people who are planning for retirement.  Fleming Watson is a Registered Investment Advisory firm located in Marietta Ohio.  Our firm primarily serves Marietta, Parkersburg, Williamstown, St. Marys, Belpre, Vienna and the surrounding communities in Washington and Noble Counties in Ohio and Wood and Pleasants county in West Virginia.

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